Pre-organized Panels

44th Annual Comparative Drama Conference

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Pre-organized Panels – Call for Papers

Pre-organized Panels and Roundtables will also be considered. A pre-organized panel should include three papers. Each paper should be 15 minutes in length. Panel proposals should include (1) a copy of each panelist’s 250 word abstract with paper title, author’s name, institutional affiliation, status, postal address and email address at top left, and (2) a succinct, 50-word rationale for the grouping of the papers. The panel organizer should email the abstracts and rationale to compdrama@rollins.edu by 3 November 2019 A pre-organized roundtable should include at least four participants. Roundtable proposals should include (1) a succinct, 50 word explanation of and rationale for the roundtable topic, (2) a timeline of the program, including time for audience interaction and Q & A, and (3) clear evidence of each participant’s expertise in the topic area. Do not send entire vitae. Include only evidence applicable to the roundtable topic. The panel or roundtable organizer should email the abstracts and rationale to compdrama@rollins.edu by 3 November 2019.
 

If you would like to advertise a pre-organized panel on the CDC website, please send the panel title, organizer contact information, deadline, and description to compdrama@rollins.edu immediately.

Calls for Pre-Organized Panel Participants

 

The Plays of Anne Washburn

The Comparative Drama Conference asks for abstracts on the plays of Anne Washburn.  The conference does not require any specific focus, but some possible topics are:

Mr. Burns: A Post-Electric Play and other post-apocalyptic plays

Washburn’s interest in the focusing on popular culture in her plays (for example, The Simpsons in Mr. Burns, her adaption of The Twilight Zone)

Washburn’s contribution to the growing number of plays about Trump or inspired by Trump 

Washburn in dialogue with other playwrights

Papers should be 15 minutes in length, written for oral presentation, and accessible to a multi-disciplinary audience. Scholars and artists in all languages and literatures are invited to email a 250 word abstract in English to Dr. William C. Boles at compdrama@rollins.edu by 3 November 2019. Please include paper title, author’s name, status (faculty, graduate student, other/scholar-at-large), institutional affiliation, and postal address at top left. Abstracts must present a clear argument and have an appropriate scope (usually two or fewer works).  Please send your abstract in .docx, .txt, or .rtf format.  If possible, please avoid sending a .pdf.

 

 

George Bernard Shaw

Sponsored by the International Shaw Society

These sessions welcome papers on any aspect of Shaw studies, including but not limited to : individual plays/characters, comparative treatment of plays by Shaw, Shaw and his contemporary playwrights, cultural aspects of Shaw’s works, and international Shaw play productions. Email 250-word abstracts to: Ellen Dolgin at: ellen.dolgin@dc.edu by 3 April 2021.

 

The Plays of David Henry Hwang

Sponsored Panel by the David Henry Hwang Society

Any abstract proposal  on David Henry Hwang’s plays are welcome.

Some possible topics include:

The generation of Asian-American playwrights who have followed Hwang and their (dis)connection with his legacy

The presence of autobiography in his plays, particularly Yellow Face and Soft Power

Hwang’s representation of China 

Comparing Hwang’s theatrical legacy with his work on Showtime’s The Affair

A discussion of Hwang’s engagement with Trump in Soft Power in comparison to other theatrical depictions of Trump

The David Henry Hwang Society was founded in 2016 at the Comparative Drama Conference with the goal of promoting scholarly examination of Hwang’s theatrical works. Since his first breakout play, FOB, in 1980, David Henry Hwang has proven the most significant and prolific Asian American playwright to date.  From the global phenomenon of M. Butterfly and more recent successes with Yellow Face, Chinglish and Soft Power, Hwang has staged stories of the Asian American experience and explored questions of race, culture, and identity.

Papers should be 15 minutes in length, written for oral presentation, and accessible to a multi-disciplinary audience. Scholars and artists in all languages and literatures are invited to email a 250 word abstract in English to Dr. William C. Boles at compdrama@rollins.edu by 3 April 2021. Please include paper title, author’s name, status (faculty, graduate student, other/scholar-at-large), institutional affiliation, and postal address at top left. Abstracts must present a clear argument and have an appropriate scope (usually two or fewer works).  Please send your abstract in .docx, .txt, or .rtf format.  If possible, please avoid sending a .pdf.

 

Adapting Print Genres for the Victorian Stage

This panel will consider how British plays within the Victorian era (1837-1901) interacted with and responded to news stories, social movements, or cultural debates appearing in print genres, including newspapers, the periodical press, and literature. Often, a theatrical adaptation of a popular novel appeared even before its serialization had concluded, as in the case of Charles Dickens’s 1839 novel Nicholas Nickleby, which appeared on 19 November 1838 at the Adelphi Theatre, adapted by Edward Stirling, a mere eight numbers into its serialization. Playwrights commonly explored sensational urban myths or legal cases, as in the cases of The String of Pearls; or, The Fiend of Fleet Street (1847) by George Dibdin Pitt, which claimed to be based on the “actual” story of murderous barber Sweeney Todd, and Edmund Falconer’s Woman; or, Love Against the World, inspired by the Yelverton Marriage case (1861). What elements from printed source material did the Victorian playwright utilize, heighten, or discard in light of theatrical conventions, or in the interests of time and visual engagement? What might Victorian audiences have expected to see on the stage after reading an adaptation’s source material? Submissions should consider the unique cultural impact exerted on the nineteenth-century theatrical public by adaptations of contemporary events, stories, and debates. 

Optimistically, this panel will take place at the 44th Comparative Drama Conference in Orlando, FL from 14-16 October 2021. However, there will also be an option for virtual readings of presentations for those unable to attend the conference in person. Abstracts of no more than 250 words for a paper 15 minutes in length should include 1) each panelist’s paper title, 2) author’s name, 3) institutional affiliation, 4) status, 5) postal address and 6) email address at top left and be emailed to Lydia Craig at lcraig1@luc.edu by the deadline.

 

Two Panels Sponsored by ATDS (American Theatre and Drama Society)

Pandemic

Papers may address any aspect of any pandemic as it is presented in or has affected American drama or theatre.  “Pandemic” should be broadly conceived so as to include influenza, plague, polio, AIDS, health care, vaccination, politics of pandemic, etc.  What might we learn from dramatic/theatrical approaches to pandemics? Did any play address the pandemic of 1918? If not, why not? How did the 1918 pandemic affect theatre? How are theatre practitioners addressing the current pandemic?

Something Else, or I really don’t want to think about the pandemic any more

Many of us have probably been continuing to work on whatever it was we were working on before the pandemic hit.  To make life a little easier for scholars in search of an appropriate panel, the topic of this session is open: anything in American drama, or performance. 

Instructions:  Please send a 250-word abstract as a WORD attachment to Dr. Verna A. Foster at vfoster@luc.edu by March 20, 2021. Please include paper title, author’s name, professional status, institutional affiliation, and postal address at top left.

Submissions can be made by non-ATDS members, but if the paper is accepted, the submitter must become an ATDS member to present on the panel.   (https://www.atds.org/)

 

 

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