Conference Awards

The Comparative Drama Conference bestows three awards every year.

The Joel Tansey Memorial Award for Graduate Student Travel to the Comparative Drama Conference

The Comparative Drama Conference is pleased to announce this award, established in 2016, and presented in memory of Joel Tansey, award-winning scholar, writer, professor of French Literature, and Assistant Editor of Text & Presentation (2008-11). Any graduate student who presents a paper at the conference is eligible for consideration. Interested applicants should submit a full-length version (15-25 pages) of their research paper, as a Word attachment, to the Editor of Text & Presentation, Amy Muse, Ammuse@stthomas.edu, by 31 December following the conference. The winning paper will be published with special recognition in Text & Presentation. The winner will also be honored at the next year’s conference, where she or he will receive the award, accompanied by $400 for conference travel expenses.

Tansey Award Winners

2021- Will this be you?

2020–COVID-19 Wins

2019–Michael Schweikardt, “Deep When: A Basic Design Philosophy for Addressing Holidays in Historical Dramas”  Text and Presentation, 2019.

2018–Kevin Lucas “August Strindberg, Amiri Baraka and the Radicalization of Domestic Tragedy” Text and Presentation, 2018.

2017–Mark Scott  “Irreconcilable Differences: Charles I, Henrietta Maria, and Jones and Townshend’s Court Masques” Text and Presentation, 2017.

2016–Ariel Sibert  “Identifying with Presence, Absence and Identity in Laurie Anderson and Mohammed el Gharani’s Habeus Corpus” Text and Presentation, 2016.

The Anthony Ellis Prize for the Best Paper by a Graduate Student

In memory of Tony Ellis, a board member, valued friend, and committed mentor to graduate students, the Comparative Drama Conference is pleased to announce the Anthony Ellis Prize for Best Paper by a Graduate Student. Any graduate student who presented a paper at the conference is eligible for consideration. Interested applicants should submit a full-length version (15-25 pages) of his/her research paper to the Editor of Text & Presentation by 31 December following the conference. The winning paper will be published with special recognition in Text & Presentation. The winner will also be honored at the next year’s conference, where he/she will have the conference registration fee waived and will receive one night’s free hotel room and $100 for additional conference expenses. Please email submissions as Word attachments to the editor, Amy Muse, AMMUSE@stthomas.edu, by 31 December following the conference.

Ellis Prize Recipients

2021–Your name goes here

2020–COVID-19 Wins

2019–Victorian Lynn Scrimer “Radical Resurrections: A Performance History of John Brown’s Body,” Text and Presentation, 2019.

2018–Victoria Lynn Scrimer “Performing a Postmodern Prometheus: Percy Shelley’s Prometheus Unbound from Page to Stage,” Text and Presentation, 2018.

2017–Mary Lutze “Challenging Accessibility: The ‘Radical Deaf Theatre’ of Aaron Sawyer’s The Vineyard,  Text and Presentation, 2017.

2016 — Beck Holden “Signifyin’ Sam: Motivated Signifyin(g) and Future Nostalgia in Post-Reconstruction Black Musicals,” Text and Presentation, 2016.

2015 – Lydia Craig (Loyola University Chicago) – “Politic Silence: Female Choruses in Lochhead’s Medea and Wertenbaker’s The Love of the Nightingale,” Text and Presentation, 2015

2014 – Giuseppe Sofo (University of Avignon/University of Rome, La Sapienza) – “Translating Tempests: A Reading of Aimé Césaire’s Une Tempête in Translation,” Text and Presentation, 2014

The Philadelphia Constantinidis Essay in Critical Theory Award

 The $1000 Philadelphia Constantinidis Essay in Critical Theory Award is given to the best comparative essay on any aspect and period of Greek drama or theatre that was published in English in any journal or anthology in any country between January 1 and December 31 in the prior year. The award was established in 2006 in memory of Philadelphia Constantinidis to encourage research and writing on Greek drama and theatre. This is an open rank competition for academics, independent scholars, and doctoral students. The award is administered by the Board of the Comparative Drama Conference. The Board solicits nominations and self-nominations for this award.
 
The winner will be notified by the Director of the Comparative Drama Conference, and will be offered complimentary hotel accommodation for one night and a registration fee waiver to attend the Comparative Drama Conference. The winner will be presented a plaque and a check for one thousand dollars ($1,000) during the awards ceremony at the main plenary session of the conference, and will be given five minutes to summarize the significance of the selected essay to the conference participants.
 
The deadline for nominations is December 31. Nominating letters and electronic copies of the essays (converted to Adobe PDF) should be emailed to The Constantinidis Award Committee, Chair Elizabeth Scharffenberger  at es136@columbia.edu‎. Postal mail and faxes are not acceptable. The letter of nomination should include the name of the author of the published essay, the title of the essay, the year of publication, the name of the journal, the email address and postal address of the author, and a brief statement explaining why this essay was chosen for nomination. Recipients of the award are not eligible for nomination for a three year period.
 

Philadelphia A. Constantinidis (1912-1982), was born in Artaki, lived in Thessaloniki, and died in Athens. She was the youngest child of a wealthy merchant who lost everything that he owned when the Greek-Anatolians were driven out of their homeland in 1922. She was a survivor of the First World War, the Greek-Turkish war, the Second World War, and the Greek Civil War. Her husband died from an old wound in 1950 and she raised her two sons alone. Her oldest son was killed in 1983. She often expressed her philosophy of life with a quote from a Greek play: “ἄνδρα δ᾽ ὠφελεῖν ἐφ᾽ ὧν ἔχοι τε καὶ δύναιτο κάλλιστος πόνων” (ΟΙΔΙΠΟΥΣ ΤΥΡΑΝΝΟΣ, 314-315). She occasionally replaced the word “ἄνδρα” (man) with the word “γυνή” (woman).

Constantinidis Award recipients

2020  Anastasia Stavroula Valtadorou (University of Edinburgh), “Erôs in Pieces (?): Tragic Erôs in Euripides’ Fragmentary Andromeda and Antigone” in Greek Drama V. Studies in the Theatre of the Fifth and Fourth Centuries BCE, pp. 115–128, edited by Hallie Marshall and C.W. Marshall, London: Bloomsbury:  115-28.

Part of the tradition of the conference has been for the winner of the Constantinidis Award to address the assembled body and give a five-minute summation of their work.  The pandemic made this impossible this year.  Since Dr. Valtadorou did not have a platform to share her comments in person,  we offer them here instead:
              I am extremely honoured to accept the Constantinidis award for my paper “Erôs in Pieces (?): Tragic Erôs in Euripides’ Fragmentary Andromeda and Antigone”, an award dedicated to the memory of a great woman and given to many distinguished scholars in the past, such as Toph Marshall, Gonda Van Steen and Marilynn Richtarik, among others.  In this essay, I have set out to explore tragic eros (‘erotic desire’) and I argue that it is more multifarious than commonly accepted. More specifically, I have focused on, and explore comparatively, Euripides’ fragmentary Antigone (420–406 BC) and Euripides’ Andromeda (412 BC), which both present young male characters falling in love with their future brides. As I show in detail, these dramas present us with examples of heterosexual couples whose eros does not end in disaster, but in a wedding; in both plays a young couple, after triumphing over formidable obstacles, will marry, have children and, in all likelihood, live happily together. Not only does eros not destroy, but it even leads to the establishment of a new oikos. Therefore, the exploration of these lost plays, and their comparison with other well-known dramas, allows for an important re-evaluation of Greek tragedy and its limits as a genre.

 

2019  The committee determined that none of the nominated papers met the award requirements.

2018        Marilynn Richtarik (Georgia State University), “Reality and Justice: Seamus Heaney’s The Cure at Troy,” Estudios Irlandeses 13 (2018): 98-112.

2017       The committee determined that none of the nominated papers met the award requirements.

2016       The committee determined that none of the nominated papers met the award requirements.

2015       C. W. “Toph” Marshall (University of British Columbia), “Performance Reception and the Cambridge Greek Play: Aristophanes’ Frogs in 1936 and 1947.” Classical Receptions Journal 7/2 (2015): 177-202.

2014       Peter E. Portmann (University of Manchester), “Arabs and Aristophanes, Menander among the Muslims: Greek Humor in the Medieval and Modern Middle East.” International Journal of the Classical Tradition 21/1 (2014): 1-29.

2013       Gonda Van Steen (University of Florida), “The Story of Ali Retzo: Brechtian Theatre in Greece under the Military Dictatorship.” Journal of Modern Greek Studies 31/1 (2013): 85-115.

2012       Loren Kruger (University of Chicago), “On the Tragedy of the Commoner: Elektra, Orestes, and Others in South Africa.” Comparative Drama 46/3 (2012): 355-377.

2011       Robert Davis (City University of New York), “Is Mr. Euripides a Communist? The Federal Theatre Project’s 1938 Trojan Incident.Comparative Drama 44/4 (2010) and 45/1 (2011): 423-440.

2010       Amanda Wrigley (Open University, UK), “A Wartime Radio Odyssey: Edward Sackville-West and Benjamin Britten’s The Rescue (1943).” The Radio Journal: International Studies in Broadcast and Audio Media 8/2 (2010): 81-104.

2009       Melinda Powers (John Jay College of Criminal Justice, City University of New York), “Unveiling Euripides.” Journal of Dramatic Theory and Criticism 23/2 (2009): 5-19.

2008       The committee determined that none of the nominated papers met the award requirements.

2007       The committee determined that none of the nominated papers met the award requirements.

2006       Kelly Younger (Loyola Marymount University,) “Irish Antigones: Burying the Colonial System.” Colloquy: text theory critique 11 (2006): n.p.