Work of the Week: Daniel Lind-Ramos, “Vencedor: 1797 (Victorius: 1797)”

Daniel Lind-Ramos (Puerto Rican, b. 1953), Vencedor: 1797 (Victorius: 1797), 2018-2019, Mixed media, 67 x 70 x 33 in. The Alfond Collection of Contemporary Art at Rollins College, Gift of Barbara ’68 and Theodore ’68 Alfond. 2020.1.1 ©Daniel Lind-Ramos The sculpture Vencedor: 1797 was

Work of the Week: Carmen Herrera, “Untitled”

Carmen Herrera (Cuban, 1915-2022), Untitled, 2013, Acrylic on canvas, 72 3/64 x 36 7/32 in. The Alfond Collection of Contemporary Art at Rollins College, Gift of Barbara ’68 and Theodore ’68 Alfond, 2014.1.32. © Carmen Herrera. Image courtesy of the artist and Lisson Gallery, London,

Work of the Week: Reginald Marsh, “A Young Woman Reading on the Subway”

I recently read Jennifer Egan’s historical novel Manhattan Beach, a noir thriller that transported me to New York during World War II. The main character, Anna Kerrigan, comes of age at a time when the country grappled with war abroad and its effects at home. Resilient and determined, Anna works at the Brooklyn Naval Yard as a diver repairing ships. The rich descriptions of the naval yard, the city streets, and the dark, smoky nightclubs, paint a vivid picture of the context in which she lived and worked. Newspapers reported on the war in Europe, and she learned of individuals’ experiences through letters and friends’ accounts. While reading, I thought about how young women experienced the city at this historical moment.

Ilya Bolotowsky Abstraction

Work of the Week: Ilya Bolotowsky, “Abstraction”

Engaging with art in challenging situations can provide respite and solace and remind us to find joy and beauty in basic things we often take for granted. As the new year unfolds and presents us with unexpected questions to consider and new goals to pursue, once again, I turn to art. It seems that for Bolotowsky, abstract art provided the order and balance needed in a historical moment that saw enormous socio-political changes as well as defining shifts in the art world.

Conversations/Collaborations: The Place as Metaphor

By MacKenzie Moon Ryan, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Art History and Gisela Carbonell, Ph.D., Curator. Last fall, the Cornell Fine Arts Museum worked closely with Dr. MacKenzie Moon Ryan, Assistant Professor of Art History at Rollins, and her ARH 404