Green square painting with white horizontal diamond by Carmen Herrera

Carmen Herrera’s quest for formal simplicity

Carmen Herrera has been described as a “quiet warrior of her art” in her uncompromising commitment to abstraction over decades of scant recognition.(1) Born in Havana in 1915, she later moved to New York and then, in 1948, to Paris,

Work of the Week: Gertrude Käsebier, “The Red Man”

Gertrude Käsebier was an early supporter of the Pictorialism movement, which sought to reverse the idea that photography could not be painterly. Joining the likes of Alfred Stieglitz and Edward Steichen in the Photo Secession group, she adopted several older, labor-intensive printing styles, used alternative chemicals that yielded more nuanced tonal ranges, and reworked her plates with paintbrushes and other methods before printing. In the pictorialists’ hands, photography was art and being a photographer was a professionalized artistic craft.

Work of the Week: Faith Ringgold, “Tar Beach”

As an artist and activist, Ringgold’s career has been dedicated to exploring themes of race and gender equality. She grew up in the creatively fertile Harlem Renaissance, a time and place where perceptions of black culture and identity were redefined. Her work incorporates the narrative traditions of quiltmaking and African American history with great resonance, serving as platform to share her story and that of those before her.

Work of the Week: Caitlin Keogh, “Renaissance Painting”

Caitlin Keogh (American, b. 1982), Renaissance Painting, 2016, Acrylic on canvas, 84 x 63 in., The Alfond Collection of Contemporary Art at Rollins College, Gift of Barbara ’68 and Theodore ’68 Alfond, 2016.3.15., Image courtesy of the artist and Bortolami, New York. If

Work of the Week: Catherine Yass, “Lighthouse (North north west, distant)”

Catherine Yass (British, b. 1963), Lighthouse (North north west, distant), 2011, Photographic transparency, lightbox, 50 ¾ x 40 ¾ in., The Alfond Collection of Contemporary Art at Rollins College, Gift of Barbara ’68 and Theodore ’68 Alfond. 2020.1.11 © Catherine Yass. Image courtesy Galerie Lelong

Work of the Week: Amy Sillman, “After Metamorphoses”

Amy Sillman (American, b. 1955), After Metamorphoses, 2015-16, Single-channel video on 5:25 min. looped, color, sound. The Alfond Collection of Contemporary Art at Rollins College, Gift of Barbara ’68 and Theodore ’68 Alfond, 2017.6.62. Image courtesy of the artist. My first introduction to Greco-Roman

Work of the Week: Lavinia Fontana, “The Dead Christ with Symbols of the Passion”

Lavinia Fontana (Italian, 1552-1614) The Dead Christ with Symbols of the Passion, ca. 1581, Oil, tempera on panel, 14 1/4 x 10 5/8 in. Gift of the late General and Mrs. John J. Carty, in memory of her brother, Thomas Russell, 1936.30 Outside of my

Work of the Week: Käthe Kollwitz, “Untitled (Mob [Family] with Dead Child)”

Käthe Kollwitz (German, 1867–1945), Untitled (“Mob [Family] with Dead Child”), n.d., Dry point etching, Gift of Mrs. Ruth Funk, Cornell Fine Arts Museum 2001.04.09.PR Where history provides perspective and comparison, art provides context and comfort. Historical art often provides both. That is why I

Work of the Week: Shirin Neshat, “In Deference”

Shirin Neshat (American, Iranian, b. 1957), In Deference, 2018, Dye-sublimination on aluminum, 25 9/16 x 40 in. The Alfond Collection of Contemporary Art at Rollins College, Gift of Barbara ’68 and Theodore ’68 Alfond, 2018.1.23. Image courtesy of the artist. I first encountered Shirin Neshat’s